WIT FITS: Effects of Weight Stigma Intervention on Exercise Professionals’ Attitudes Toward Fatness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Luciana Zuest, Saemi Lee, Janaina Fogaça, Nikole Squires, Dawn E. Clifford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Exercise professionals often hold anti-fat attitudes, which contribute to weight stigma and discrimination in physical activity contexts. This study examined the effects of an online weight stigma intervention on exercise professionals’ attitudes toward fatness. Participants were 105 exercise professionals who were employed at least part-time at university recreation centers in the United States. In this randomized controlled trial, participants were randomized into an intervention online course to decrease weight stigma or a control online course to learn about communication techniques to enhance motivation for physical activity. Attitudes about fatness were assessed at pre- and post-course using the Fat Attitudes Assessment Toolkit (FAAT). There were significant increases in the fat acceptance composite score in the intervention group compared to the control group, suggesting recreation center staff who completed the intervention WIT FITS course experienced more positive evaluations of fat people as a result of the intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalRecreational Sports Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • (HAES®)
  • anti-fat attitudes
  • fitness
  • recreation centers
  • weight-inclusive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

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