“We constantly have to navigate”: Indigenous students’ and professionals’ strategies for navigating ethical conflicts in STEMM

Angelina E. Castagno, Jani C. Ingram, Ricky Camplain, Davona Blackhorse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper reports on a research project that explored ethical, cultural, and/or spiritual conflicts and the various strategies used to navigate the conflicts among over 400 Indigenous students and professionals in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine [Our initial project was conceptualized as including STEM fields (not including the final M for medicine/health-related fields). However, our work included survey respondents and interviewees in medicine/health-related fields, so our subsequent analysis and discussion uses the more inclusive acronym of STEMM.] (STEMM) fields. These navigational strategies include teaching others and leveraging their support, engaging in ceremonial practices to provide protection and correction when needed, being in the right mindset and/or acting in the right ways, and—for some—changing pathways altogether. By centering Indigenous students' and professionals’ voices and experiences, we learn how intentional, complex, and thoughtful their strategies must be.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCultural Studies of Science Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Epistemology
  • Ethical conflicts
  • Indigenous
  • Native science
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '“We constantly have to navigate”: Indigenous students’ and professionals’ strategies for navigating ethical conflicts in STEMM'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this