Virome-wide detection of natural infection events and the associated antibody dynamics using longitudinal highly-multiplexed serology

Erin J. Kelley, Sierra N. Henson, Fatima Rahee, Annalee S. Boyle, Anna L. Engelbrektson, Georgia A. Nelson, Heather L. Mead, N. Leigh Anderson, Morteza Razavi, Richard Yip, Jason T. Ladner, Thomas J. Scriba, John A. Altin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current methods for detecting infections either require a sample collected from an actively infected site, are limited in the number of agents they can query, and/or yield no information on the immune response. Here we present an approach that uses temporally coordinated changes in highly-multiplexed antibody measurements from longitudinal blood samples to monitor infection events at sub-species resolution across the human virome. In a longitudinally-sampled cohort of South African adolescents representing >100 person-years, we identify >650 events across 48 virus species and observe strong epidemic effects, including high-incidence waves of Aichivirus A and the D68 subtype of Enterovirus D earlier than their widespread circulation was appreciated. In separate cohorts of adults who were sampled at higher frequency using self-collected dried blood spots, we show that such events temporally correlate with symptoms and transient inflammatory biomarker elevations, and observe the responding antibodies to persist for periods ranging from ≤1 week to >5 years. Our approach generates a rich view of viral/host dynamics, supporting novel studies in immunology and epidemiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1783
JournalNature Communications
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemistry
  • General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • General Physics and Astronomy

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