Unveiling the relationships among adolescents’ persistent academic possible selves, academic self-concept, self-regulation, and achievement: A Longitudinal and Moderated Mediation Study

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Abstract

This study investigates adolescents’ persistent academic possible selves (PAPS), academic self-concept, self-regulation, and achievement in a longitudinal and interactive context (N = 113). The PAPS incorporates future-oriented motivation (i.e., motivation to develop academic possible selves) and future-oriented self-regulated learning (i.e., commitment to utilizing self-regulated learning to achieve those selves). By administering three surveys, I found that adolescents’ PAPS grow over the semester, but the growth did not directly relate to achievement. Additionally, their academic self-concept and self-regulation at the beginning of the semester functioned differently to predict the growth of PAPS. Lastly, PAPS promoted future achievement only when it is mediated by current self-regulation. The mediation effect was robust regardless of the level of academic self-concept and past achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSelf and Identity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • academic self-concept
  • Adolescents
  • persistent academic possible selves
  • self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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