The use of voice recognition software as a compensatory strategy for postsecondary education students receiving services under the category of learning disabled

Kelly D. Roberts, Robert A. Stodden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research on the use of voice recognition software (VRS) as a compensatory strategy for written language difficulties, often experienced by postsecondary education students receiving services under the category of learning disabled, is minimal, with one study [16] reporting findings. Higgins and Raskind [16] found writing samples of their subjects, completed with VRS, had higher holistic scores than samples completed with assistance from a transcriber, and without assistance. The research presented in this article builds on this finding through investigation of research questions that address ongoing use of VRS, influence of VRS on writing performance, and variables that influence both of these areas. Key findings include ongoing use of the software being dependent upon need and personal issues; written performance improvements contingent upon need; and key variables influencing ongoing use, including: time, ease of use/acquisition of skills, personal issues, use of Standard English, disability (area affected), and the use of other effective compensatory strategies. This article outlines characteristics of individuals who may benefit from using the software, implications for specific populations, and direction for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-64
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Volume22
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assistive technology
  • Dragon Naturally Speaking
  • Learning disabled
  • Speech recognition
  • Voice recognition software
  • Written language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Occupational Therapy

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