The Structural Consistency of a Six-Factor Model of Academic Self-Concept Among Culturally Diverse Preadolescents in the United States

Gary J. Ockey, Sara Abercrombie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

For decades, research has indicated that preadolescents' self-concept is comprised of subject-specific academic factors, a general academic factor, and several nonacademic factors. More recently, there have been some indications that academic self-concept might further be differentiated into competence and affect factors, at least for some preadolescent ethnic groups. This study examines the extent to which a 6-factor model of academic self-concept, in which competence and affect are distinct, is tenable for White, Hispanic, and Native American preadolescents. A total of 313 White, 331 Hispanic, and 224 Native American preadolescents from the southwestern United States were administered a modified version of the SDQI. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated that the 6-factor model of academic self-concept was tenable. A multiple-groups CFA suggested that the 6-factor model was largely group invariant between White and Hispanic and White and Native American preadolescents. However, important differences in the structures were identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-283
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Psychoeducational Assessment
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • academic self-concept
  • cross-cultural
  • preadolescents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Clinical Psychology
  • General Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Structural Consistency of a Six-Factor Model of Academic Self-Concept Among Culturally Diverse Preadolescents in the United States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this