The hard life of open source software project newcomers

Igor Steinmacher, Igor Scaliante Wiese, Tayana Conte, Marco Aurelio Gerosa, David Redmiles

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

While onboarding an open source software (OSS) project, contributors face many different barriers that hinder their contribution, leading in many cases to dropouts. Many projects leverage the contribution of outsiders and the sustainability of the project relies on retaining some of these newcomers. In this paper, we discuss some barriers faced by newcomers to OSS. The barriers were identified using a qualitative analysis on data obtained from newcomers and members of OSS projects. We organize the results in a conceptual model composed of 38 barriers, grouped into seven different categories. These barriers may motivate new studies and the development of appropriate tooling to better support the onboarding of new developers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication7th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE 2014 - Proceedings
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages72-78
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450328609
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event7th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE 2014 - Hyderabad, India
Duration: Jun 2 2014Jun 3 2014

Publication series

Name8th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE 2014 - Proceedings

Conference

Conference7th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE 2014
Country/TerritoryIndia
CityHyderabad
Period6/2/146/3/14

Keywords

  • Barrier
  • Grounded theory
  • Joining
  • New developers
  • Newbies
  • Newcomers
  • Onboarding
  • Open source software
  • Qualitative study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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