Student and advisor gender identity in STEM doctoral programs: Examining longitudinal and mediating effects with latent growth models

Jennifer M. Blaney, David F. Feldon, Kaylee Litson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While previous research documents that women in STEM doctoral programs tend to fare better when their advisor shares their gender identity, this study provides new insights into the role of student–advisor gender identity congruence, relying on a longitudinal sample of doctoral students in biology and using structural equation and latent growth curve modeling. Findings show that advisor gender played an inconsistent and typically indirect role in predicting student outcomes. Further, all students, regardless of gender, tended to report higher quality advising when their advisor was a woman, pointing to potential gender inequities in advising expectations of faculty. Implications for research, theory, and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1416-1446
Number of pages31
JournalJournal of Research in Science Teaching
Volume59
Issue number8
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • advisor gender
  • biological sciences
  • doctoral students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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