Social cognitive predictors of first- and non-first-generation college students' academic and life satisfaction

Patton O. Garriott, Aaron Hudyma, Chesleigh Keene, Dana Santiago

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study tested Lent's (2004) social- cognitive model of normative well-being in a sample (N = 414) of first- and non-first-generation college students. A model depicting relationships between: positive affect, environmental supports, college self-efficacy, college outcome expectations, academic progress, academic satisfaction, and life satisfaction was examined using structural equation modeling. The moderating roles of perceived importance of attending college and intrinsic goal motivation were also explored. Results suggested the hypothesized model provided an adequate fit to the data while hypothesized relationships in the model were partially supported. Environmental supports predicted college self-efficacy, college outcome expectations, and academic satisfaction. Furthermore, college self-efficacy predicted academic progress while college outcome expectations predicted academic satisfaction. Academic satisfaction, but not academic progress predicted life satisfaction. The structural model explained 44% of the variance in academic progress, 56% of the variance in academic satisfaction, and 28% of the variance in life satisfaction. Mediation analyses indicated several significant indirect effects between variables in the model while moderation analyses revealed a 3-way interaction between academic satisfaction, intrinsic motivation for attending college, and first-generation college student status on life satisfaction. Results are discussed in terms of applying the normative model of well-being to promote first- and non-first-generation college students' academic and life satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-263
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Academic satisfaction
  • College adjustment
  • First-generation college students
  • Life satisfaction
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Social cognitive predictors of first- and non-first-generation college students' academic and life satisfaction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this