Selective sweeps and polygenic adaptation drive local adaptation along moisture and temperature gradients in natural populations of coast redwood and giant sequoia

Amanda R. De La Torre, Manoj K. Sekhwal, David B. Neale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dissecting the genomic basis of local adaptation is a major goal in evolutionary biology and conservation science. Rapid changes in the climate pose significant challenges to the survival of natural populations, and the genomic basis of long-generation plant species is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated genome-wide climate adaptation in giant sequoia and coast redwood, two iconic and ecologically important tree species. We used a combination of univariate and multivariate genotype–environment association methods and a selective sweep analysis using non-overlapping sliding windows. We identified genomic regions of potential adaptive importance, showing strong associations to moisture variables and mean annual temperature. Our results found a complex architecture of climate adaptation in the species, with genomic regions showing signatures of selective sweeps, polygenic adaptation, or a combination of both, suggesting recent or ongoing climate adaptation along moisture and temperature gradients in giant sequoia and coast redwood. The results of this study provide a first step toward identifying genomic regions of adaptive significance in the species and will provide information to guide management and conservation strategies that seek to maximize adaptive potential in the face of climate change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1826
JournalGenes
Volume12
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Climate adaptation
  • GEA
  • Polygenic adaptation
  • Selective sweeps
  • Sequoia sempervirens
  • Sequoiadendron gigan-teum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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