Post-earthquake Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and their Correlates among College-Youths in Kathmandu, Nepal

Vinita Sharma, Bruce Lubotsky Levin, Guitele J. Rahill, Julie A. Baldwin, Aditi Luitel, Stephanie L. Marhefka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Exposure to earthquake has previously been associated with adverse mental health outcomes, however, evidence is limited among youth in resource-limited settings. This study explored the association of retrospective extent of exposure on current day depressive symptoms and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among 125 youth attending a college in Kathmandu, Nepal. A self-administered survey including socio-demographic variables, scale for earthquake exposure and Nepali language validated standardized scales for depressive and PTSD symptoms was used. Prevalence estimates for depressive symptoms was 43.2% and PTSD symptoms was 19.2%. For each increasing unit of the extent of earthquake exposure, the odds of having depressive symptoms increased by a factor of 1.26 (p = 0.001) and PTSD symptoms increased by a factor of 1.26 (p = 0.002). Being in a complicated romantic relationship increased the odds of both depressive symptoms and PTSD symptoms. Exposure to earthquake is an important factor to consider while assessing depressive and PTSD symptoms among youth earthquake survivors in Kathmandu. It is important that programs or policies aimed at youth mental health concurrently address disaster exposures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1595-1609
Number of pages15
JournalPsychiatric Quarterly
Volume92
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Earthquake exposure
  • PTSD symptoms
  • Resilience
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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