News Frames and News Exposure Predicting Flu Vaccination Uptake: Evidence from U.S. Newspapers, 2011–2018 Using Computational Methods

Zhan Xu, Lauren Ellis, Mary Laffidy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Flu remains a prevalent public health issue and the flu vaccine uptake remains low. This study examined the behavioral consequences of first- and second-level agenda setting by testing the effects of exposure to flu-related news coverage and different frames on flu vaccine uptake, while controlling for confounding sociodemographic factors, utilizing computational methods. Findings suggested that the media effects on children and adult influenza vaccine uptake differed. The frame of influenza caused deaths/illnesses stories was the only media frame that positively predicted flu vaccine uptake among children. Four frames, including influenza caused deaths/illnesses stories, flu prevention tips, things to know about flu vaccine, and public accountability positively predicted flu vaccine uptake among adults. Exposure rate negatively predicted flu vaccine uptake among adults. A few sociodemographic factors impacted flu vaccine uptake. Results also revealed the most and least exposed frames and state exposure rates to flu-related news stories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-82
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Communication
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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