Increased cardiac output, not pulmonary artery systolic pressure, increases intrapulmonary shunt in healthy humans breathing room air and 40% O2

Jonathan E. Elliott, Joseph W. Duke, Jerold A. Hawn, John R. Halliwill, Andrew T. Lovering

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Key points: The contribution of blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVAs) to pulmonary gas exchange efficiency remains unknown and controversial. Intravenous infusion of adrenaline (epinephrine) increases blood flow through IPAVAs detected by the transpulmonary passage of saline contrast and breathing 40% O2 minimizes potential contributions from ventilation-to-perfusion inequality and diffusion limitation. Pulmonary gas exchange efficiency was impaired to the same degree, and the transpulmonary passage of saline contrast was not different, in humans at rest during the intravenous infusion of adrenaline before and after atropine when breathing room air and 40% O2. Cardiac output increased to the same degree during intravenous infusion of adrenaline before and after atropine, but pulmonary artery systolic pressure only increased significantly before atropine. These data demonstrate that blood flow through IPAVAs contributes to pulmonary gas exchange efficiency and that blood flow through IPAVAs is predominantly mediated by increases in cardiac output rather than increases in pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVAs) has been demonstrated to increase in healthy humans during a variety of conditions; however, whether or not this blood flow represents a source of venous admixture (Q˙ VA /Q˙T) that impairs pulmonary gas exchange efficiency (i.e. increases the alveolar-to-arterial PO2 difference (A-aDO2)) remains controversial and unknown. We hypothesized that blood flow through IPAVAs does provide a source of Q˙ VA /Q˙T. To test this, blood flow through IPAVAs was increased in healthy humans at rest breathing room air and 40% O2: (1) during intravenous adrenaline (epinephrine) infusion at 320 ng kg-1 min-1 (320 ADR), and (2) with vagal blockade (2 mg atropine), before and during intravenous adrenaline infusion at 80 ng kg-1 min-1 (ATR + 80 ADR). When breathing room air the A-aDO2 increased by 6 ± 2 mmHg during 320 ADR and by 5 ± 2 mmHg during ATR + 80 ADR, and the change in calculated Q˙ VA /Q˙T was +2% in both conditions. When breathing 40% O2, which minimizes contributions from diffusion limitation and alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion inequality, the A-aDO2 increased by 12 ± 7 mmHg during 320 ADR, and by 9 ± 6 mmHg during ATR + 80 ADR, and the change in calculated Q˙ VA /Q˙T was +2% in both conditions. During 320 ADR cardiac output (Q˙T) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) were significantly increased; however, during ATR + 80 ADR only Q˙T was significantly increased, yet blood flow through IPAVAs as detected with saline contrast echocardiography was not different between conditions. Accordingly, we suggest that blood flow through IPAVAs provides a source of intrapulmonary shunt, and is mediated primarily by increases in Q˙T rather than PASP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4537-4553
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume592
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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