In Lak'ech, the chicano clap, and fear: A partial rhetorical autopsy of Tucson's now-illegal ethnic studies classes

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Abstract

This article investigates the rhetorical effects of pedagogical choices in the Mexican American Studies (MAS) program in Tucson, Arizona. MAS embraced cultural and linguistic border spaces to invent new rhetorical traditions, which led both to successful outcomes for Latin@ students and also to the program's demise. The article draws on interviews with former MAS teachers and students to describe MAS and its subsequent removal; to trace the rhetorical effects and evolution of various opening rituals many MAS classes used, such as reciting In Lak'ech and doing the Chicano clap; and to elucidate the consequences of this work for schools and communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-270
Number of pages24
JournalCollege English
Volume80
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Cultural studies
  • Curriculum reform
  • Identity
  • Latin/Latinx studies
  • Mexican American studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics

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