Impact of Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Services on Discharge to the Community by Value-Based Payment Programs After Joint Replacement Surgery

Amit Kumar, Indrakshi Roy, Meghan Warren, Stefany D. Shaibi, Maximilian Fabricant, Jason R. Falvey, Amit Vashist, Amol M. Karmarkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of hospital-based rehabilitation services on community discharge rates after hip and knee replacement surgery according to hospital participation in value-based care models: bundled payments for care improvement (BPCI) and comprehensive care for joint replacement (CJR). The secondary objective was to determine whether community discharge rates after hip and knee replacement surgery differed by participation in these models. Methods: A secondary analysis of Medicare fee-for-service claims was conducted for beneficiaries 65 years of age or older who underwent hip and knee replacement surgery from 2016 to 2017. Independent variables were hospital participation in value-based programs categorized as: (1) BPCI, (2) CJR, and (3) non-BPCI/CJR; and total minutes per day of hospital-based rehabilitation services categorized into tertiles. The primary outcome variable was discharged to the community versus discharged to institutional post-acute care settings. The association between rehabilitation amount and community discharge among BPCI, CJR, and non-BPCI/CJR hospitals was adjusted for patient-level clinical and hospital characteristics. Results: Participation in BPCI or CJR was not associated with community discharge. This analysis found a dose-response relationship between the amount of rehabilitation services and odds of community discharge. Among those who received a hip replacement, this relationship was most pronounced in the BPCI group; compared with the low rehabilitation category, the medium category had odds ratio (OR) = 1.28 (95% CI = 1.17 to 1.41), and the high category had OR = 1.90 (95% CI = 1.71 to 2.11). For those who received a knee replacement, there was a dose-response relationship in the CJR group only; compared with the low rehabilitation category, the medium category had OR = 1.21 (95% CI = 1.15 to 1.28), and the high category had OR = 1.56 (95% CI = 1.46 to 1.66). Conclusion: Regardless of hospital participation in BPCI or CJR models, higher amounts of rehabilitation services delivered during acute hospitalization is associated with a higher likelihood of discharge to community following hip and knee replacement surgery. Impact: In the era of value-based care, frontloading of rehabilitation care is vital for improving patient-centered health outcomes in acute phases of lower extremity joint replacement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpzab313
JournalPhysical therapy
Volume102
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2022

Keywords

  • Acute Care
  • Bundle Payment
  • Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement
  • Hip Replacement
  • Knee Replacement
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Post-Acute Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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