Health at Every Size College Course Reduces Dieting Behaviors and Improves Intuitive Eating, Body Esteem, and Anti-Fat Attitudes

Lauren Humphrey, Dawn Clifford, Michelle Neyman Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of a Health at Every Size general education course on intuitive eating, body esteem (BES), cognitive behavioral dieting scores, and anti-fat attitudes of college students. METHODS: Quasi-experimental design with 149 students in intervention (45), comparison (66), or control (46) groups. Analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey adjusted tests were used. RESULTS: Mean scores for total general education course on intuitive eating (P <.001), unconditional permission to eat (P <.001), reliance on hunger (P <.001), cognitive behavioral dieting scores (P <.001), BES appearance (P =.006), BES weight (P <.001), and anti-fat attitudes (P <.001) significantly improved from pre to post in the intervention group compared with control and comparison groups. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Students in the Health at Every Size class improved intuitive eating, body esteem, and anti-fat attitudes and reduced dieting behaviors compared with students in the control and comparison groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-360.e1
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • college students
  • intuitive eating
  • Social Cognitive Theory
  • weight management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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