Global journalism in decision-making moments: A case study of Canadian and American television coverage of the 2009 United Nations framework convention on climate change in Copenhagen

Magda Konieczna, Kristine Mattis, Jiun Yi Tsai, Xuan Liang, Sharon Dunwoody

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Climate change is a phenomenon with global causes but local effects, and thus global climate change decision-making moments provide ideal opportunities to examine how local and global discourses work together - or do not - through global journalism. This case study investigates the globally focused vs. culturally bound frames used in television news coverage, in Canada and the USA, of the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. Initial quantitative findings that Canadian media used many more culturally bound sources than did American media contradict the past findings and suggest Canadian media engaged less in producing global journalism than did American media. A follow-up qualitative analysis not only found more global framing in the American stories, but also concluded that global sources did not necessarily create global journalism; instead, a global orientation is required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-507
Number of pages19
JournalEnvironmental Communication
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Copenhagen
  • climate change
  • globalization
  • journalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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