Finding the needles in the haystacks: High-fidelity models of the modern and Archean solar system for simulating exoplanet observations

Aki Roberge, Maxime J. Rizzo, Andrew P. Lincowski, Giada N. Arney, Christopher C. Stark, Tyler D. Robinson, Gregory F. Snyder, Laurent Pueyo, Neil T. Zimmerman, Tiffany Jansen, Erika R. Nesvold, Victoria S. Meadows, Margaret C. Turnbull

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present two state-of-the-art models of the solar system, one corresponding to the present day and one to the Archean Eon 3.5 billion years ago. Each model contains spatial and spectral information for the star, the planets, and the interplanetary dust, extending to 50 au from the Sun and covering the wavelength range 0.3-2.5 μm. In addition, we created a spectral image cube representative of the astronomical backgrounds that will be seen behind deep observations of extrasolar planetary systems, including galaxies and Milky Way stars. These models are intended as inputs to high-fidelity simulations of direct observations of exoplanetary systems using telescopes equipped with high-contrast capability. They will help improve the realism of observation and instrument parameters that are required inputs to statistical observatory yield calculations, as well as guide development of post-processing algorithms for telescopes capable of directly imaging Earth-like planets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number124401
JournalPublications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
Volume129
Issue number982
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Instrumentation: high angular resolution
  • Planet-disk interactions
  • Planets and satellites: atmospheres
  • Techniques: imaging spectroscopy
  • Zodiacal dust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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