Examining the relationship between introductory computing course experiences, self-efficacy, and belonging among first-generation college women

Jennifer M. Blaney, Jane G. Stout

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Computing self-efficacy and sense of belonging are known predictors of motivation and persistence. As such, these psychological states are important to study in order to broaden participation in computing. This study examined the relationship between (a) introductory computing course experiences and (b) self-efficacy and sense of belonging in computing, focusing on differences by gender and college generation status. We found that the relationship between some introductory course experiences and self-efficacy and sense of belonging was strongest among first-generation college women, which reveals the importance of considering women's experiences in light of their additional intersectional identities. Recommendations for best practices in introductory computing courses are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSIGCSE 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages69-74
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781450346986
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 8 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event48th ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE 2017 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Mar 8 2017Mar 11 2017

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Conference on Integrating Technology into Computer Science Education, ITiCSE

Conference

Conference48th ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period3/8/173/11/17

Keywords

  • First-generation students
  • Gender
  • Introductory computing courses
  • Self-efficacy
  • Sense of belonging
  • Undergraduate students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this