Does the Impact of Episodic Memory Declines on Future Changes in Perceived Control Vary Based on Individuals' Experience With Cognitively Demanding Jobs?

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study proposes and evaluates a scenario wherein cognitive demands experienced at work can amplify the positive cross-lagged association of a shift in control beliefs following changes in episodic memory. METHODS: From the Health and Retirement Study (2006-2018) for 9,998 participants aged 50 or above, we used repeated observations of memory and control beliefs, assessed with the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified (TICS-m) and self-mastery and perceived constraints questionnaires. A dual-Latent Change Score Model estimated the cross-lagged effects between memory and control beliefs, separately for individuals with prior high cognitive job demands and those without. RESULTS: A decline in memory led to decreased control beliefs in terms of perceived constraints, only among those with experiences in cognitively demanding jobs. DISCUSSION: High cognitive job demands may lead to a more cognitively oriented awareness of aging, thus amplifying the impact of memory decline on control constraints.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume79
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2024

Keywords

  • Cognitive health
  • Control beliefs
  • Longitudinal change
  • Social psychology
  • Work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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