Creatively re-defining fat: identification predicts strategic responses to stigma, ingroup attitudes, and well-being

Olivia J. Lindly, Michelle R. Nario-Redmond, Jeffrey G. Noel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antifat stigma is pervasive, often incurring deleterious effects on well-being among fat women. Based on predictions from Social Identity Theory, we examined the relationship between fat group identification, individual and collective responses to stigma, body satisfaction and self-esteem among a community-based sample of fat women. Fat group identification was found to predict collective social change and body affirmation endorsement along with reduced support for individual change through weight loss. Fat identification also predicted a preference for affiliation with other fat people, stronger perceptions of size discrimination, and less antifat prejudice. Implications of creatively redefining fat to affirm self-worth are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-195
Number of pages17
JournalFat Studies
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antifat attitudes
  • Collective coping strategies
  • Fat stigma
  • Individual coping strategies
  • Social identity
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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