“Cancer is in style”: lifestyle change and the perceived impact of globalization on Andean indigenous communities in Ecuador

Dinorah Martinez Tyson, Enrique Teran, Lillie Uyên Loan Đào, Vanessa Chee, Isabel Hernández, Mercedes Flores, Miguel Reina Ortiz, Ricardo Izurieta, Julie A. Baldwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: There is a paucity of information on cancer among Indigenous populations in Latin America. Methods: Guided by tenets of community engaged research and syndemic theory, we conducted eight focus groups (n = 59) with Kichwa men and women in the province of Imbabura, Ecuador. Data were analyzed using applied thematic analysis techniques. Results: Cancer emerged as an important health problem and was reported as a growing concern. Kichwa participants in this study attributed the rise in cancer to (1) exposure to chemicals and pesticides, (2) urbanization and development, and (3) the rise of innutritious, westernized diets. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the Kichwa are attuned to the global phenomena in which traditional diet has been replaced by western, processed foods and fast food, which result in higher levels of chronic diseases such as cancer. More research is needed to understand the cancer burden among Indigenous peoples in Latin America.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-167
Number of pages15
JournalEthnicity and Health
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • focus groups
  • Indigenous populations
  • Kichwa
  • Latin America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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