Building partnerships between indigenous communities and universities: lessons learned in HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention research.

Julie A. Baldwin, Jeannette L. Johnson, Christine C. Benally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention studies in American Indian and Alaska Native communities have been directed by academic researchers with little community input. We examined the challenges in conducting HIV/AIDS-related research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities and the benefits of changing the research paradigm to a community-based participatory model. The lessons we learned illustrate that the research process should be a cyclical one with continual involvement by community members. Steps in the process include (1) building and sustaining collaborative relationships, (2) planning the program together, (3) implementing and evaluating the program in culturally acceptable ways, and (4) disseminating research findings from a tribal perspective. These steps can enhance the long-term capacity of the community to conduct HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S77-82
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume99 Suppl 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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