Baseline results from NenŨnkUmbi/EdaHiYedo: A randomized clinical trial to improve sexual and reproductive health among American Indian adolescents

Elizabeth Rink, Mike Anastario, Malory Peterson, Paula FireMoon, Olivia Johnson, Ramey GrowingThunder, Adriann Ricker, Genevieve Cox, Shannon Holder, Julie A. Baldwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report on baseline findings from NenUnkUmbi/EdaHiYedo, a community based participatory research randomized controlled trial with American Indian adolescents to reduce sexual and reproductive health disparities. American Indian adolescents aged 13−19 years participated in a baseline survey that was administered in five schools. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression to evaluate how the count of protected sexual acts was associated with independent variables of interest. We stratified models by self-reported gender of adolescents and tested for a two-way interaction effect between gender and the independent variable of interest. Two hundred twenty-three girls and 222 boys (n = 445) were sampled. The average number of lifetime partners was 1.0 (standard deviation = 1.7). Each additional lifetime partner was associated with a 50% increase in the number of protected sexual acts incident rate ratio (IRR = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1−1.9) and more than a twofold increase in the likelihood of not having protected sexual acts (adjusted odd ratio [aOR] = 2.6, 95% CI 1.3−5.1). Each additional number of substances used in adolescentss' lifetime was associated with an increased likelihood of not having protected sexual acts (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.0−1.5). In boys, each one standard deviation increase in depression severity was associated with a 50% reduction in the number of times a condom was used adjusted IRR (aIRR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.4−0.6, p <.001). Each 1-unit increase in positive prospections of pregnancy was associated with a pronounced decrease likelihood of not having protected sexual acts (aOR = 0.01, 95% CI 0.0−0.1). Findings support the importance of tribally driven tailoring of sexual and reproducive health interventions and services for American Indian adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)844-859
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume95
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2023

Keywords

  • American Indian adolescents
  • community based participatory research
  • randomized control trial
  • sexual and reproductive health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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