Associations among affect, diet, and activity and binge-eating severity using ecological momentary assessment in a non-clinical sample of middle-aged fathers

Tyler B. Mason, Bridgette Do, Daniel Chu, Britni R. Belcher, Genevieve F. Dunton, Nanette V. Lopez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Knowledge of within-day factors associated with binge-eating severity among middle-aged fathers is limited. The purpose of the current report was to examine within-day associations of affect, diet, and activity in relation to binge-eating severity using ecological momentary assessment (EMA) in men. Methods: Twenty-three middle-aged fathers completed 8 days of EMA and wore accelerometers to objectively assess activity. Generalized estimating equations assessed relationships among affect, diet, and activity and binge-eating severity. Results: When positive affect was above average, men reported greater binge-eating severity in the next 2 h. Oppositely, when negative affect was above average, men reported less binge-eating severity in the next 2 h. At times when men reported consumption of sweets and fast food, they reported higher binge-eating severity during the same 2-h window. Men with greater average levels of light activity reported less overall binge-eating severity. Conclusions: Findings show that affect, unhealthy food intake, and light activity could be targeted among middle-aged fathers to reduce binge-eating severity and prevent eating disorders. Level of evidence: Level III: Evidence obtained from cohort or case-control analytic studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-551
Number of pages9
JournalEating and Weight Disorders
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Binge eating
  • Eating disorders
  • Ecological momentary assessment
  • Men

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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