Asians and Asian Americans’ social media use for coping with discrimination: A mixed-methods study of well-being implications

Chia chen Yang, Jiun Yi Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although social media has the potential to serve as a coping tool, it is unclear how Asians and Asian Americans use social media to cope with discrimination, and how social media coping is associated with these users’ psycho-emotional well-being. Drawing on the Multidimensional Model of Social Media Use, this mixed-methods study examined the well-being implications of three social media coping activities among Asians and Asian Americans. A total of 931 Asians and Asian Americans in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 93 (M = 46.49, SD = 16.58; 49.2% female) completed an anonymous online survey. Twenty-three participants (12 females) between the ages of 19 and 70 joined seven focus group interviews. Survey results showed that messaging was related to greater race-based traumatic stress (RBTS), although it also had a weak indirect relationship with positive emotions through social support. Posting and commenting had an indirect relationship with both lower RBTS and greater positive emotions via social support. Reading and browsing was associated with greater RBTS (directly) and positive emotions (both directly and indirectly through social support). Focus group data revealed how the three activities contributed to perceived social support and why these activities were associated with promising and/or concerning well-being outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere16842
JournalHeliyon
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2023

Keywords

  • Approach-oriented coping
  • Asian American
  • Discrimination
  • Racism
  • Social media
  • Social media coping
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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