A Comparative Analysis of Factors Affecting the Frequency and Severity of Freight-Involved and Non-Freight Crashes on a Major Freight Corridor Freeway

Samuel G. Taylor, Brendan J. Russo, Emmanuel James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traffic crashes cost society billions of dollars each year as a result of property damage, injuries, and fatalities. Additionally, traffic crashes have a negative impact on mobility, as they are a primary cause of non-recurring delay. With the Interstate 10 corridor between the ports of Los Angeles and Houston being one of the most vital links for goods movement across the United States, safety and mobility along this freeway, particularly for freight traffic, are of significant concern. This study, which utilized six years of crash data from the state of Arizona, explores factors affecting the frequency and severity of crashes along the Arizona portion of the I-10 corridor, with a particular focus on freight-related crashes. The safety performance along the I-10 is analyzed through the development of crash frequency and severity prediction models using integrated crash, roadway, traffic, and environmental data. Negative binomial and ordered logit models, with the incorporation of random parameters, were estimated to provide a detailed understanding of factors associated with freight-involved crashes and how they compare to non-freight crashes in terms of frequency and severity. The results showed that several roadway- crash-, vehicle-, and person-related variables were associated with the frequency and/or severity of crashes along the study corridor. These findings provide important insights which can be used to develop or plan countermeasures aimed at improving the safety and efficiency of freight travel, which may include new ITS technologies, and targeted educational and enforcement campaigns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-62
Number of pages14
JournalTransportation Research Record
Volume2672
Issue number34
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

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