A community-based evaluation of a culturally grounded, american indian after-school prevention program: The value of practitioner-researcher collaboration

Brooke de Heer, Jade K. Heffern, Julianna S. Cheney, Aaron Secakuku, Julie Baldwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Programs serving American Indian (AI) youth are an important component of maintaining cultural identity and healthy lifestyles. The current research took a community-engaged approach to evaluate an urban AI youth after-school program that has transitioned into a culturally grounded prevention program. Ways to create a successful research collaboration between AI communities and academics is discussed as well as implications for understanding the importance of culturally-grounded programs for AI youth who reside in urban areas. Overall, the cultural and health components that are integrated into the after-school program were highlighted as primary strengths because they help foster a healthy lifestyle and deeper connection to the heritage/culture for the youth who participated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • General Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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